Bereaved families angered by plan to release Palestinian prisoners

(JNS.org) Families of terror victims are harshly criticizing the Israeli government's plan to release 85 Palestinians imprisoned prior to the 1993 Oslo Accords as a goodwill gesture to the Palestinian Authority ahead of renewed peace talks.

Click photo to download. Caption: Gilad Shalit upon his return to Israel. Ahlam Tamimi, a Palestinian woman who transported both the bomb and the bomber to the Sbarro restaurant in downtown Jerusalem for an August 2001 attack, was freed from prison in October 2011 as part of the deal in which 1,027 Palestinian prisoners were exchanged for Shalit, who spent more than five years in Hamas captivity. Arnold Roth's 15-year-old daughter Malki and 14 others killed in the attack orchestrated by Tamimi. Credit: IDF.

Arnold Roth—whose 15-year-old daughter, Malki, was murdered along with 14 others when a suicide bomber struck the Sbarro pizza restaurant in downtown Jerusalem on Aug. 9, 2001—told JNS.org that Israel “conceded to the U.S. administration,” which “had to deliver this,” by agreeing to the prisoner release.

“From the standpoint of simple negotiating theory, what Israel has done, even if Israel never actually delivers, is a losing move,” Roth said. “Even if there were a case for saying Israel ought to concede to a list of pre-negotiating demands from the other side, freeing terrorists ought never to have been one of them.”

Ahlam Tamimi, a Palestinian woman who transported both the bomb and the bomber to the Sbarro restaurant, was freed from prison in October 2011 as part of the deal in which 1,027 Palestinian prisoners were exchanged for Gilad Shalit, the Israeli soldier who spent more than five years in Hamas captivity.

“I am emphatically not political, and it does not come naturally to me to be speaking against something the government in its wisdom decided to do,” Roth said. “But the idea to hand over murderers in order to prime some sort of negotiating pump simply enrages me.”

Israel Defense Forces Sgt. Avraham Bromberg died at age 20 four days after being attacked on his way home from a Golan Heights base by Karim Younis and his cousin Maher Younis in November 1980, but Israeli President Shimon Peres commuted their sentences in August 2012, making them eligible for parole in 2023. The Palestinians now the demand that the Younis cousins be included in the upcoming prisoner release by Israel.

“It is inconceivable that the state can ignore the bereaved families like this,” said Bromberg’s son, Avi, according to Israel Hayom.

 http://www.jns.org/news-briefs/2013/7/24/bereaved-families-angered-by-release-of-palestinian-prisoners

Posted on July 24, 2013 .