Israeli political sources say alternate coalition could prevent election

The Israeli Knesset. Credit: Wikimedia Commons.

(Israel Hayom/Exclusive to Tensions in the political theater have been rising steadily since the motion for the dissolution of the Knesset passed its preliminary and first readings on Wednesday, as all parties are anxiously waiting to see if the bill truly does pass its second and third readings, which have been set for Monday.

While most political experts believe early elections are a fait accompli, some hedged that until the ink is dry on the third reading's papers, a scenario in which a last-minute political deal is struck to prevent the Knesset's dissolution cannot be completely discounted.

Knesset sources said Thursday that negotiations have resumed between coalition officials and the haredi parties, in an effort to include them in the government and prevent early elections. Sources in the haredi parties confirmed that overtures have been made to that effect, but refused to say whether talks could actually mature into a deal before Monday.

Israeli law stipulates that early elections must be called at least 90 days and no more than 150 days from the Knesset's dissolution, meaning the Knesset can theoretically postpone the latter stages of the vote by several weeks. Should the MKs defer the vote, it would afford the coalition time to try and form an alternate government.


Posted on December 5, 2014 .