Secret Nazi lair reportedly found in Argentina

Nazi leader Adolf Eichmann, pictured here in Israel's Ayalon Prison, had taken refuge in Argentina after World War II. Credit: Wikimedia Commons.

(Israel Hayom/Exclusive to A team of archaeologists from the University of Buenos Aires believe they have found a secret Nazi hideout in the Teyu Cuare provincial park, in the Misiones region of northern Argentina, The Telegraph reported.

The hidden lair consists of several nearly inaccessible stone structures, in which the archaeologists found “German coins from the late 1930s, fragments of ‘Made in Germany’ porcelain, and Nazi symbols on the walls,” according to the report.

The archaeological team’s leader, Daniel Schavelzon, said there seems to be no other explanation for the unusual structures than a planned refuge for German leaders in the event of a defeat, part of a larger project to create Nazi safe havens in far corners around the world.

“This site also has the bonus of allowing the inhabitants to be in Paraguay in less than 10 minutes. It’s a protected, defendable site where they could live quietly,” Schavelzon said.

After World War II, Argentina would ultimately welcome Nazi leaders, including Adolf Eichmann (who was later trapped by Israeli agents before being put on trial and executed in Israel), rendering this particular Nazi lair unnecessary.

Posted on March 23, 2015 .