Opinion

Netanyahu’s rivals are going the extra mile

The fact that politicians and functionaries alike can undermine the prime minister’s diplomatic efforts under the guise of the election is both absurd and outrageous.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu leads the weekly Cabinet meeting, at his office in Jerusalem on June 8, 2014. To his right is then-Cabinet Secretary and current Attorney General Avichai Mandelblit; to his left is former Likud challenger and current New Hope Party leader Gideon Sa'ar. Photo by Marc Israel Sellem/POOL/Flash90.
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu leads the weekly Cabinet meeting, at his office in Jerusalem on June 8, 2014. To his right is then-Cabinet Secretary and current Attorney General Avichai Mandelblit; to his left is former Likud challenger and current New Hope Party leader Gideon Sa'ar. Photo by Marc Israel Sellem/POOL/Flash90.
Amnon Lord (Israel Hayom)
Amnon Lord
Amnon Lord is an Israeli journalist with the daily newspaper “Makor Rishon.” His articles and essays about media, film and politics have been published in “The Jerusalem Post,” “Mida,” “Azure,” “Nativ” and “Achshav.”

Inaction, apathy and stupidity are the three markers of a failed leader.

But in Israel, a solution has been found to this situation, and it has become the default mode for politicians and functionaries alike—namely, accosting Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. After all, if they can’t sideline him, the least they can do is narrow his steps.

In this respect, Netanyahu’s robust diplomatic endeavors are a thorn in his rivals’ side, and Attorney General Avichai Mandelblit and Blue and White leader Benny Gantz are constantly trying to find ways to undermine him.

This invention, by which other government officials can simply torpedo any government decision—from trips abroad to appointing ministers—during an election campaign is beyond absurd. Moreover, it is unheard of in any other democracy. In the United States, for example, an outgoing president can carry out any diplomatic or policy move, and even grant presidential pardons, up until his last day in office.

In Israel, however, once elections are called, the government seemingly ceases to exist, leaving the attorney general and his deputies to do as they see fit.

Augmenting the absurdity is the fact that while the prime minister is barred from pursuing any policy move, and no public appointments are allowed, the attorney general becomes apoplectic over vacancies in a few ministries.

The most egregious sabotage we have recently witnessed was, of course, undercutting Israel’s vaccine diplomacy. This severely damaged Israel’s national interest, thus serving the objective of Netanyahu’s detractors.

This article first appeared in Israel Hayom.

The opinions and facts presented in this article are those of the author, and neither JNS nor its partners assume any responsibility for them.
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