In an interview with the New York Post’s Page Six on Wednesday, rapper Kanye West made it clear that he has no reservations about his recent anti-Semitic statements and social media posts.

“Hey, if you call somebody out for bad business, that means you’re being anti-Semitic. I feel happy to have crossed the line of that idea so we can speak openly about things like getting canceled by a bank,” he said at a screening of a new documentary by conservative pundit Candace Owens.

West was referring to JP Morgan Chase, the bank that served his clothing empire, which dropped him following his comments.

Owens tweeted a screenshot of an email she claimed was from JP Morgan Chase telling West he has until Nov. 21 to find a new bank.

“As I gather my thoughts about this, I want to say that I do not care what you think about Ye West, but I very much care what you think about this,” Owens said. “We have reached extremely frightening times in this country.”

West, who has officially changed his name to “Ye,” sparked outrage on Monday with a now-deleted tweet saying that he was going to go “death con 3” on Jewish people. He followed up the tweet by asking his followers, “Who do you think created cancel culture?”

Owens defended West on her show following his comments, claiming, “If you are an honest person, you did not think this tweet was anti-Semitic.”

The social media posts came soon after West was interviewed by Fox News’ Tucker Carlson. 

Vice obtained footage that was cut out of the aired interview in which West expressed his belief in anti-Semitic conspiracy theories.

“I’d prefer my kids knew Hanukkah than Kwanzaa, at least it would come with some financial engineering,” he told Carlson, alluding to the conspiracy theory that Jews control the global financial system.

JNS

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