update deskSchools & Higher Education

ADL updates antisemitism levels at 85 campuses: 12 better, three worse

“It is completely unacceptable that some university leaders have let the situation get this out of hand,” says CEO Jonathan Greenblatt.

Sports fans exit Michigan Stadium after a University of Michigan football game on Sept. 4, 2021. Credit: Chad Robertson Media/Shutterstock.
Sports fans exit Michigan Stadium after a University of Michigan football game on Sept. 4, 2021. Credit: Chad Robertson Media/Shutterstock.

Updated analysis from the Anti-Defamation League shows progress at American academic institutions that are strengthening their approach to countering antisemitism on campus. Still, it assesses that three top universities have fallen further in their obligations to protect students and faculty.

On Tuesday, the ADL released a revised edition of its “Report Card” assessing the levels of hatred against Jewish students following the Hamas terrorist attacks in southern Israel on Oct. 7, including protests and tent encampments coordinated by anti-Israel activist groups such as Students for Justice in Palestine.

The original assessment on April 11 assigned two schools an “A,” 17 schools a “B,” 29 schools a “C,” 24 schools a “D” and 13 schools an “F.”

This new analysis lists two schools still at an “A,” 18 at a “B,” 32 schools at a “C,” 24 schools at a “D” and nine schools at an “F” grade.

In the revised ratings, the ADL says seven colleges have risen from an “F”to a “D”: Michigan State University, Princeton University, Stanford University, SUNY Purchase, SUNY Rockland Community College, Swarthmore College and the University of Virginia.

Meanwhile, three schools fell from a “D” grade to an “F”: Northwestern University; the University of California, Los Angeles; and the University of Michigan.

“When we released these grades last month, we did not dare to imagine how much more challenging this school year would get for Jewish students,” attested Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO and national president of the ADL.

He described recent weeks as “marked by an alarming surge in anti-Jewish hate connected to the encampments and other on-campus protests, putting students’ safety at risk and even prompting some schools to cancel graduation.”

Noting that the conclusion to the academic year “should be a joyous time for students and their families,” Greenblatt said “it is completely unacceptable that some university leaders have let the situation get this out of hand.”

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