update deskSchools & Higher Education

At Yeshiva U, ‘accelerated transfer’ for students who feel threatened

"For the future of higher education, the American university system needs to meet the challenges of this moment," YU's president said.

A fireside chat between Rabbi Ari Berman, president of Yeshivah University, and Mauricio Karchmer on the professor leaving MIT to join the staff at Yeshiva. Credit: Courtesy.
A fireside chat between Rabbi Ari Berman, president of Yeshivah University, and Mauricio Karchmer on the professor leaving MIT to join the staff at Yeshiva. Credit: Courtesy.

Yeshiva University has reopened its admissions cycle for undergraduate applicants who feel threatened on other American campuses, including for its honors program. Those applicants have until May 31 to apply.

The admissions cycle “has seen students choosing YU over other elite institutions. This trend is expected to continue among transfers,” Yeshiva stated.

It added that it is creating new faculty positions to accommodate that growth and is “in active discussions with professors who seek to be part of an institution whose core values align with their own.”

“We have all watched with great shock and sadness the public protests laced with antisemitism on college campuses throughout the United States, including in our neighboring campuses of Columbia and NYU,” stated Rabbi Ari Berman, president of YU.

“Ultimately, these are issues that need to be addressed by these respective universities. It is not good for America or for the Jewish people for any campus to be unsafe for Jewish students or students of any minority or vulnerable population,” Berman said. “We extend our hand to be of any assistance in supporting efforts by these universities to protect their students from threats to their safety.”

“We cannot ignore the profound distress we have been witnessing. No Jewish student should have to face the threats and intimidation that has sadly been taking place,” he added. “While our enrollments are already full for the coming year, we at the flagship Jewish university will not turn our backs on these students.”

Yeshiva is also accepting transfers for students who want to study in Israel in YU’s program with Tel Aviv University and with Bar-Ilan University.

JNS sought comment from Yeshiva about how much interest the university has seen in its pitch to transfer students.

Earlier this year, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor cited Jew-hatred in his decision to leave his “dream job” to come to Yeshiva.

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