The vast majority of the German/Austro-Hungarian Jewish World War I veterans and their families were murdered in the Holocaust. Being a veteran and holding an Iron Cross didn’t matter to the Nazis and their supporters.

Young German-Austrian Jews, and even some older veterans of World War I, who escaped to join the Allies during World War II, fought with a vengeance, which not even the Allies understood.

The Germans/Austro-Hungarians were never stabbed in the back by the Jews. It was the Jews who were stabbed in the back by them.

From the documentary film “Stabbed in the Back.” Credit: www.jewishdocumentaries.info.

“We cannot change what happened anymore. The only thing we can do is learn from the past and realize what discrimination and persecution of innocent people mean. I believe that it’s everyone’s responsibility to fight prejudice. To build up a future, you have to know the past,” said Otto Frank, father of the famed Holocaust diarist Anne Frank.

He had served as a German army officer and a lieutenant of artillery on the Western Front in World War I. Though decorated, the Nazis sent him to Auschwitz. They murdered his wife and two daughters.

Their crime? They were Jews.

Peter Rosenbluth’s remarkable documentary, “Stabbed in the Back,” tells the little-known story of the more than 500,000 Jews who served with the Central Powers during World War I.

Click here to see the movie, which is available for free.

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