The midterm elections in the United States historically have been a “lifesaver” for America, and those of 2022 are shaping up to be just that. Indeed, a drowning U.S. is being thrown a major flotation device for its survival.

After the recent gubernatorial election in Virginia which saw GOP candidate beat heavily favored Democrat Terry McAuliffe, as well as other Republican upsets, there is reason to believe that this trend will continue.

When former President Barack Obama proposed the Affordable Care Act in October 2009, the Republicans took the House of Representatives the following year in a decisive midterm victory—winning 242 seats, after having had only 178 prior to that election. It was the highest number of lost seats by the party of a sitting president in a midterm election since 1938. And it saved America.

The midterms are course corrections. America is split down the middle. If a president is too overreaching, he finds out about it in his second year. The founding fathers knew what they were doing. America does not like extremes.

President Joe Biden was elected because he touted middle-of-the-road themes and a moderate philosophy. It was all a ruse. He is far from a moderate. He has joined forces with the most radical elements of his party.

America thought he would do a better job of handling the coronavirus pandemic than his predecessor. The pandemic was by far and away the most important reason for his declared victory. What he forgot and continues to forget is that half the country voted for former President Donald Trump.

From the outset, Biden decided to be the “anti-Trump.” Instead of aligning himself with moderate Democrats, he sided with the inexperienced radical left of his party.

He created chaos along the southern border. He allowed inflation to decimate the American worker who had been badly bruised by the pandemic.

Inflation now the highest that it’s been in the U.S. in 30 years. Overall prices rose 6.2 percent, but what really causes Americans to get over-heated and change their votes is the cost of gasoline, which bumped by 50 percent, and that of beef, which rose by 20 percent.

The U.S. economy doesn’t show signs that it will improve that much, and most likely will be worse by next November, given the supply-chain problems.

The economy isn’t the only factor that will sway voters in 2022, however. Obviously, the management of the pandemic is crucial, too. Other issues have become paramount in the minds of Americans, as well.

Foreign policy still plays a role. The disastrous withdrawal from Afghanistan will plague the president not only in 2022, but in 2024, as well.

Biden’s persistent and inappropriate pressure on Israel to open a consulate in Jerusalem for Palestinians will also be a wedge issue. Such a move would not only be a violation of American law; it would be a waste of the American taxpayers’ money, since the U.S. embassy in Jerusalem already performs all the functions that the proposed consulate is supposed to perform.

It would also divide Jerusalem—something that, for the past 50 years, Biden has said he’d never do.
He also had his State Department criticize Israel for giving the green light to building 3,140 housing units in Judea and Samaria.

His administration also gave Israel a hard time over designating six Palestinian NGOs that are fronts for the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine as terrorist organizations.

He will find out that all of the above factors will hurt him significantly in the midterm elections. This reality is coming into sharper focus with each passing day.

Dr. Joseph Frager is first vice president of the National Council of Young Israel.

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