update deskIsrael News

Cemetery fence to be lowered after uproar over Hamas victim’s burial

Alina Plahti began a conversion process during her IDF service but had not completed it.

Representatives of the Chief Rabbinate of Israel cross Jaffa Road as they deliver a kashrut certificate to a restaurant in Jerusalem, Dec. 31, 2019. Photo by Hadas Parush/Flash90.
Representatives of the Chief Rabbinate of Israel cross Jaffa Road as they deliver a kashrut certificate to a restaurant in Jerusalem, Dec. 31, 2019. Photo by Hadas Parush/Flash90.

A fence that separates graves at a cemetery in the Israeli city of Beit She’an based on religion will be lowered and covered with vegetation following an uproar over the separate burial of a victim of the Hamas attack whom the Chief Rabbinate does not consider Jewish.

The Chief Rabbinate official’s announcement on Thursday came after public criticism over the burial of Alina Plahti, 23, who was buried last month at a separate compound of the city’s New Cemetery.

Her father is Jewish and she began a conversion process during her IDF service but had not completed it.

Plahti, who was murdered by Hamas terrorists at the Supernova music festival near the border with Gaza, was interred in the section of the cemetery for people who are not considered Jewish according to the Orthodox interpretation of halachah, Jewish religious law.

Her family expressed the wish that she had been buried in the central section of the cemetery, and not be separated by a tall fence.

Rabbinical officials have issued various rulings on the mixed burial of Jews and non-Jews, ranging from unequivocal rejection of the prospect to permission to do it if this helps preserve peaceful relations.

Religious ceremonies for Jews in Israel, including funerals and weddings, remain under the control of the ultra-Orthodox.

You have read 3 articles this month.
Register to receive full access to JNS.

Just before you scroll on...

Israel is at war.

JNS is combating the stream of misinformation on Israel with real, honest and factual reporting. In order to deliver this in-depth, unbiased coverage of Israel and the Jewish world, we rely on readers like you.

The support you provide allows our journalists to deliver the truth, free from bias and hidden agendas. Can we count on your support?

Every contribution, big or small, helps JNS.org remain a trusted source of news you can rely on.

Become a part of our mission by donating today
Topics
Comments
Thank you. You are a loyal JNS Reader.
You have read more than 10 articles this month.
Please register for full access to continue reading and post comments.
Never miss a thing
Get the best stories faster with JNS breaking news updates