Twitter has clarified its stance at using the Star of David imagery after some users who display it in their profile pictures were locked out of their accounts for using “hateful imagery.”

According to the Campaign Against Antisemitism, users have received the following message: “We have determined that this account violated the Twitter Rules. Specifically for: Violating our rules against posting hateful imagery. You may not use hateful images or symbols in your profile image or profile header. As a result, we have locked your account.”

“We want to clarify some questions about hateful imagery on Twitter. We categorically do not consider the Star of David as a hateful symbol or hateful image. We have for some time seen the ‘yellow star’ or ‘yellow badge’ symbol being used by those seeking to target Jewish people,” said Twitter in a thread. “This is a violation of the Twitter Rules, and our Hateful Conduct Policy prohibits the promotion of violence against—or threats of attack towards—people on the basis of categories such as religious affiliation, race and ethnic origin.”

“While the majority of cases were correctly actioned, some accounts highlighted recently were mistakes and have now been restored,” added Twitter, which named both the U.K.-based Campaign Against Antisemitism and Community Security Trust, and the U.S.-based Anti-Defamation League.

The Campaign Against Antisemitism and ADL applauded Twitter for the course correction.

“Good to see Twitter clarifying the difference between images used to harass and when used to express identity and empathy. The Star of David is an ancient symbol that represents all Jews and our solidarity,” tweeted ADL national director and CEO Jonathan Greenblatt.

“Success for CAA as @Twitter reverses locks on accounts with Stars of David, but questions remain as to why this policy was in place at all,” tweeted the Campaign Against Antisemitism.

The Community Security Trust has yet to react to the correction.

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