“Anti-Semitism has not disappeared,” president of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen said while on a visit last week to Israel. “It still poisons our societies. … It is a new threat, but it is the same old evil. Every new generation must take responsibility so that the past does not return.”

Von Der Leyen is absolutely right. As the years go by, the “old evil” becomes more sophisticated, especially when governments and commissions are involved rather than brainwashed individuals with shaved heads.

Unfortunately for anti-Semites, loading Jews onto cattle cars is no longer an option. So instead, they have chosen to play smart, and get some humanitarian points along the way.

The poison that Von Der Leyen was referring to is no doubt part of her daily routine, as well as that of 26 out of 27 representatives of European member states in the European Parliament. How do I know? Because immediately after Von Der Leyen’s remarks, she traveled to Ramallah, where she met with Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Mohammad Shtayyeh. The prime minister was promptly astonished when the European Commission president told him that the E.U.’s 225 million euro ($237 million) aid package designated for the P.A. would be restored.

Why was Shtayyeh astonished? Because this aid package was put on hold in April 2021 after P.A. school curriculum was “revealed” to include two books that incite violence against Jews, including calls to murder Israelis. These are still on the list of books that Palestinian parents buy their children at the beginning of each year. Shtayyeh did not expect the aid package to be renewed, because he assumed Von Der Leyen’s visit was a courtesy at best.

Do not be fooled, the massive aid package has been renewed not in spite of the fact that the Palestinians have not removed anti-Semitic books from their curriculum, but precisely because of it.

The Palestinian desire to murder Jews resonates with Europe’s same inclination. Von der Leyen was right that anti-Semitism is alive and kicking and continues to poison society. There is no doubt that she and those she represents are in need of a massive detox, but the chances it will happen are very, very low.

Karni Eldad is a journalist, columnist and editor.

This article was originally published by Israel Hayom.

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