update deskArchaeology

Archeologists uncover ancient stone workshop outside Jerusalem

The workshop, dating back to the Second Temple period, was discovered along Road 437 between Geva Binyamin/Adam and Kfar Hizma.

Remnants of an ancient workshop for stone utensils that were discovered during roadworks outside Jerusalem, Sept. 18, 2023. Photo by the Civil Administration Archaeology Unit.
Remnants of an ancient workshop for stone utensils that were discovered during roadworks outside Jerusalem, Sept. 18, 2023. Photo by the Civil Administration Archaeology Unit.

Israeli archeologists have discovered an ancient workshop for the manufacture of stone utensils just outside Jerusalem, the Civil Administration’s Archaeology Unit announced on Monday.

The workshop, which experts said dates back to the Second Temple period (516 BCE-70 C.E.), was discovered along Road 437 between Geva Binyamin/Adam and Kfar Hizma, north of the Israeli capital.

“During an excavation administered by the Staff Officer for Archaeology in the Civil Administration, remains were uncovered not only of tools but of an entire production center, which included several quarries,” a spokesperson for the Civil Administration told local media.

“During the Second Temple period, it was customary to use utensils made of stone,” added the spokesperson. “Stone utensils have been discovered and are being found at almost every site, in various forms– cups, bowls, trays and various other utensils that are meticulously styled and designed.”

Benny Har-Even, the head staff officer of the Civil Administration’s Archaeology Unit, said that the Civil Administration “will continue to work day and night to preserve the archeological sites and findings in Judea and Samaria, which are part of the treasures and culture of the region.”

Israeli archeologists uncovered a similar workshop near Hizma some 30 years ago, indicating that the area was once a major center for the mining, production and distribution of stone tools, serving ancient Jewish Jerusalem and its environs.

“Two thousand years later, we are privileged to continue the work of our ancestors here and widen the road from the Binyamin communities to Jerusalem,” commented the Binyamin Regional Council, which has jurisdiction over large parts of southern Samaria.

Earlier this year, the Israeli Transportation Ministry and the Jerusalem Municipality started work on widening Road 437 between the busy Hizma checkpoint and the Sha’ar Binyamin industrial park.

The project includes adding multiple lanes in each direction in order to significantly reduce travel time between Jerusalem and the Samaria region.

You have read 3 articles this month.
Register to receive full access to JNS.

Just before you scroll on...

Israel is at war.

JNS is combating the stream of misinformation on Israel with real, honest and factual reporting. In order to deliver this in-depth, unbiased coverage of Israel and the Jewish world, we rely on readers like you.

The support you provide allows our journalists to deliver the truth, free from bias and hidden agendas. Can we count on your support?

Every contribution, big or small, helps JNS.org remain a trusted source of news you can rely on.

Become a part of our mission by donating today
Topics
Comments
Thank you. You are a loyal JNS Reader.
You have read more than 10 articles this month.
Please register for full access to continue reading and post comments.
Never miss a thing
Get the best stories faster with JNS breaking news updates