On a Jan. 29 show on Jordan Today TV, Jordanian political activist and head of the Aqaba chapter of the Muslim Brotherhood-affiliated Islamic Action Front Khaled Al-Jihni said that Israel’s new Ramon Airport near Eilat is built on occupied Jordanian land and that the entire Eilat area should be referred to as “Occupied Western Aqaba.”

Al-Jihni said that Jordan should not allow its airspace to be used. He claimed that the Ramon airport is a “matter of life or death [for Israel] … as a result of what the Palestinian and Lebanese resistance has done to it.” He added the it is Jordan’s turn to “suffocate” Israel and that Jordan should not always avoid confrontation.

Following are excerpts:

Khaled Al-Jihni: The [Ramon] Airport is built entirely on occupied Jordanian land. The land on which this airport is built is occupied Jordanian land; it does not belong to Palestine, to the occupation state, or to any other country.

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These lands were occupied on March 10, 1949 by orders from Glubb Pasha, who withdrew the Jordanian army from that area. This is occupied Jordanian land. There is no natural barrier in that area. I call the Eilat area and the area where this airport is located “Occupied Western Aqaba.” Part of Jordan is under occupation, but to this day, the government refuses to listen.

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This airport is built entirely on occupied Jordanian land. Jordan should not hold negotiations. Rather, it should activate the Chicago Convention and prevent this airport from using its airspace.

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The Zionist entity will not accept anything unless a fait accompli is forced upon it. This entity is not used to this. It was only forced to accept a fait accompli—for example, by the forces of resistance and Jihad in Palestine. The Arab countries have never imposed a fait accompli upon it.

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For [Israel], this airport is a matter of life and death. This airport is this entity’s artery to the world as a result of what the Palestinian and Lebanese resistance has done to it. They proved that this entity can be suffocated and now it is our turn.

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War is not the direction I am going, but that doesn’t mean that I should avoid the confrontation when this entity comes near me.