Six Israeli wineries won gold medals in the 2020 Decanter World Wine Awards.

Considered the “Oscars” of wine awards, Decanter’s competition has become the world’s largest wine contest over the past 17 years.

“Over 28 consecutive days in August, 116 of the world’s top wine experts, including 37 Masters of Wine and nine Master Sommeliers, blind tasted 16,518 wines under strict Covid safety guidelines, resulting in 50 Best in Show, 178 Platinum, 537 Gold, 5,234 Silver and 7,508 Bronze medals,” reports Decanter.

The six Israeli gold medalists are all reds: Gofna Cabernet Franc Réserve from Gva’ot Winery (vintage 2017), Peak from Psagot Winery (2016), Secret Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon and Mosaic Exclusive Edition from Shiloh Winery (2017), Black Tulip from Tulip Winery (2017), and Cabernet Sauvignon from Yarden Winery (2016).

In addition, 31 Israeli wines got silver awards and 28 received bronze awards.

Psagot Winery’s Peak scored highest among Israeli medalists in the 2020 Decanter World Wine Awards. Photo: courtesy.

The silver awardees—four whites and 27 reds—were from Adir, Carmel, Dalton, Ella Valley, Gat Shomron, Golan Heights, Gva’ot, Har Bracha, Karmei Yosef, Maia, Psagot, Recanati, Shiloh, Teperberg and Tura Estate wineries.

The bronze awardees were from Adir, Bravdo, Carmel, Dalton, Ella Valley, Gat Shomron, Golan Heights, Gva’ot, Har Bracha, Karmei Yosef, Recanati, Shiloh and Teperberg wineries. They included 18 reds, nine whites and one rosé (Adir’s 2019 Kerem Ben Zimra Barbera Rosé).

The Israeli winery that garnered the most Decanter awards this year was Shiloh, with two golds, seven silvers and four bronzes.

 

Shiloh Winery received the most medals of any Israeli winery in the 2020 Decanter World Wine Awards. Photo: courtesy.

The highest-scoring Israeli wine, with 96 points, was Psagot’s Peak. The other gold medalists each scored 95 points.

This article was first published by Israel21c.

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